Recent Posts

A Little Drinking Might Lengthen Your Life: Study

A Little Drinking Might Lengthen Your Life: Study

A Little Drinking Might Lengthen Your Life: Study By Dennis ThompsonHealthDay Reporter Latest Nutrition, Food & Recipes News TUESDAY, Aug. 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Light to moderate drinking can lower your overall risk of premature death and, specifically, your odds of dying from heart […]

Health Tip: Sleepiness on the Job

Health Tip: Sleepiness on the Job

Health Tip: Sleepiness on the Job Latest Sleep News (HealthDay News) — About 13 percent of all accidents that happen at the workplace are related to being sleepy on the job, the National Safety Council says. Some 97 percent of workers have at least one […]

Choosing a Gym: Exercise Your Options

Choosing a Gym: Exercise Your Options

Choosing a Gym: Exercise Your Options

News Picture: Choosing a Gym: Exercise Your OptionsBy Julie Davis
HealthDay Reporter

Latest Exercise & Fitness News

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) — There’s more to choosing a gym than just a low membership cost or lots of fancy equipment.

Get the answers to the following questions to find the right one for you.

First, see if there are enough cardio and strength-training options to meet both of these key health goals, suggest the experts at the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM). Ask if the facility has both the types of equipment and the classes you like. If, for example, Pilates is at the top of your wishlist, but isn’t offered, it’s not a good match.

Gym Checklist:

  • Classes that interest you.
  • Variety of cardio equipment.
  • Variety of strength-training equipment.

Expert supervision enhances the health benefits of exercise, so make sure the staff has appropriate training as well as certification from an organization like ACSM or the American Council on Exercise. Also ask if they’ll tailor a program to your unique needs.

Better Gym Offerings:

  • Programs suited to your age group.
  • Pre-activity screening or a fitness assessment to uncover any medical conditions or risk factors.
  • A personalized or modified program that meets your needs.
  • Programs that address medical conditions like arthritis, if needed.

Practical considerations count, too. Studies show you’re more likely to go to a gym that’s convenient, either near your home or work. Check it out during the hours you’re most likely to use it to see what the wait times are for machines and how crowded classes are.

Practical Considerations:

  • Is it near home or work and easy to get to?
  • Is it clean, well maintained and well-lit?
  • Is there good heating, cooling and ventilation?

Finally, before signing up, be sure to read any contract carefully. Get an explanation of all fees and ask whether you can opt out if the gym doesn’t live up to your expectations.

MedicalNews
Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Published at Wed, 16 Aug 2017 03:00:00 -0400

Your website strongly encourages consumption of vegetables – including consumption of cruciferous vegetables like kale. But what about risk of contamination by thallium? Aren't cruciferous vegetables likely to contain unwanted amounts of this heavy metal?

Your website strongly encourages consumption of vegetables – including consumption of cruciferous vegetables like kale. But what about risk of contamination by thallium? Aren't cruciferous vegetables likely to contain unwanted amounts of this heavy metal? Thallium contamination of food has become a controversial topic on […]

Notice of Health Canada’s Proposal to Enable the Use of Tamarind Gum as an Emulsifying, Gelling, Stabilizing and Thickening Agent in Unstandardized Foods and Certain Standardized Foods – Reference Number: NOP/ADP-0026

Notice of Health Canada’s Proposal to Enable the Use of Tamarind Gum as an Emulsifying, Gelling, Stabilizing and Thickening Agent in Unstandardized Foods and Certain Standardized Foods – Reference Number: NOP/ADP-0026 The information you provide through this survey is collected under the authority of the […]

From the kitchen: Tips for Preparing Grapes

From the kitchen: Tips for Preparing Grapes

Grapes should be washed under cold running water right before consuming or using in a recipe. After washing, either drain the grapes in a colander or gently pat them dry. If you are not going to consume the whole bunch at one time, use scissors to separate small clusters of grapes from the stem instead of removing individual grapes. This will help keep the remaining grapes fresher by preventing the stem from drying out.

While some recipes call for peeled grapes, evaluate the recipe to see whether including the skin would actually greatly change the taste and texture, since the grape skin contains many of the fruit’s vital nutrients. If retention of the skin isn’t objectionable for recipe reasons, we recommend that you always include the skin on account of its nutrient richness. If you decide to use peeled grapes, it’s easier to use the American varieties since their skin more readily pulls away from the pulp.

Grapes retain their maximum amount of nutrients and their maximum taste when they are enjoyed fresh and not prepared in a cooked recipe. Cooking temperatures used in baking of 350°F/175°C can damage some of the unique and delicate phytonutrients found in this amazing fruit.

Published at Tue, 15 Aug 2017 11:25:57 -0400

Best sources of Vitamin B2

Best sources of Vitamin B2 World’s Healthiest Foods rich invitamin B2 FoodCalsDRI/DV For serving size for specific foods see the Nutrient Rating Chart. Basic Description Vitamin B2, also known as riboflavin, is arguably the only vitamin that gives you a visual cue as to its […]

Should I Eat a Diet Based on my Blood Type?

Should I Eat a Diet Based on my Blood Type? Title: Should I Eat a Diet Based on my Blood Type?Category: Doctor’s & Expert’s views on SymptomsCreated: 8/15/2017 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 8/15/2017 12:00:00 AM Published at Tue, 15 Aug 2017 00:00:00 PDT

Health Tip: The Facts About Fat

Health Tip: The Facts About Fat

Health Tip: The Facts About Fat

Latest Nutrition, Food & Recipes News

(HealthDay News) — Not all fat should be cut from our diets, the American Heart Association says.

Some fats are actually good for you and should be included in a healthy meal plan, the AHA says. These include polysaturated and monosaturated fats, such as those found in avocados and salmon, which can help lower “bad” cholesterol and triglycerides.

On the other hand, you should limit eating “saturated” fats, such as those found in cheese, butter and heavy cream. These fats increase your risk of heart disease and can raise “bad” cholesterol in your blood.

Then there are those fats that you should avoid altogether: artificial trans fats, hydrogenated oils and tropical oils. Found primarily in some baked goods, they are even more likely than saturated fats to raise your “bad” cholesterol and boost your chances of developing heart disease.

— Susannah Jones

MedicalNews
Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Published at Tue, 15 Aug 2017 03:00:00 -0400

‘Fat But Fit’ a Myth?

‘Fat But Fit’ a Myth? Title: ‘Fat But Fit’ a Myth?Category: Health NewsCreated: 8/14/2017 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 8/15/2017 12:00:00 AM Published at Tue, 15 Aug 2017 00:00:00 PDT