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More Fruits and Veggies Can Slash Obesity Odds

More Fruits and Veggies Can Slash Obesity Odds Title: More Fruits and Veggies Can Slash Obesity OddsCategory: Health NewsCreated: 5/19/2017 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 5/19/2017 12:00:00 AM Published at Fri, 19 May 2017 00:00:00 PDT

Health Tip: Your Diet as You Age

Health Tip: Your Diet as You Age Title: Health Tip: Your Diet as You AgeCategory: Health NewsCreated: 5/19/2017 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 5/19/2017 12:00:00 AM Published at Fri, 19 May 2017 00:00:00 PDT

Study Refutes Viagra-Melanoma Link

Study Refutes Viagra-Melanoma Link

Study Refutes Viagra-Melanoma Link

News Picture: Study Refutes Viagra-Melanoma Link

Latest Mens Health News

FRIDAY, May 19, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Some good news for sexually active older men: Viagra and related erectile dysfunction drugs do not increase the risk of deadly melanoma skin cancer, researchers report.

“Physicians should still screen for melanoma risk, but they do not need to add the use of Viagra and similar drugs to the list of screening criteria specifically,” said study leader Dr. Stacy Loeb.

Loeb is a urologist and assistant professor at NYU Langone Medical Center.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration last year placed Viagra (sildenafil) and other ED drugs known as phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors on its watch list of medications with possible safety issues.

This action followed a 2014 report in JAMA Internal Medicine that linked Viagra with an increased risk of melanoma.

To clarify the issue, researchers analyzed data from five large-scale studies of more than 866,000 erectile medication users. While men who used the drugs had an overall 11 percent increased risk of melanoma, there wasn’t evidence that the drugs cause melanoma.

The link appears due to what the researchers called “detection bias.” This means that men likely to take erectile medications are more health-conscious, more likely to see a doctor, and therefore more likely to get diagnosed with melanoma than other men of similar age, the researchers said.

“In general, men should continue to be careful about the risk of any kind of skin cancer from excessive sun exposure and use sun protection,” Loeb said in an NYU news release.

“Overall, Viagra and other PDE5 inhibitors are safe medications as long as men are not taking nitrates, which carry a risk of reducing blood pressure,” she added. “Physicians and patients should not be concerned about taking these medications on account of worry about melanoma.”

The findings were published online May 19 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

— Robert Preidt

MedicalNews
Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

SOURCE: NYU Langone Medical Center, news release, May 19, 2017

Published at Fri, 19 May 2017 07:00:00 +0000

How Much Water Do You Really Need?

How Much Water Do You Really Need?

How Much Water Do You Really Need? By Joan McCluskyHealthDay Reporter Latest Nutrition, Food & Recipes News THURSDAY, May 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) — You might have heard that drinking 8 glasses of water a day has health benefits that range from weight loss to […]

Drink Water, Fight Fat?

Drink Water, Fight Fat? Title: Drink Water, Fight Fat?Category: Health NewsCreated: 5/18/2017 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 5/18/2017 12:00:00 AM Published at Thu, 18 May 2017 00:00:00 PDT

Enlarged Prostate ( BPH, Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia)

Enlarged Prostate ( BPH, Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia)

Enlarged Prostate ( BPH, Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia)

Find out when you should seek medical attention for prostate problems.

Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: PSA Test

The PSA test is a blood test. The PSA test can be used to suggest the presence of prostate cancer, to monitor its treatment, or assess its recurrence.

The PSA test can also be abnormal with benign enlargement (benign prostatic hyperplasia or BPH), inflammation (prostatis), and infection of the prostate gland.

Enlarged prostate (BPH) definition and facts

  • The prostate gland produces a fluid that becomes part of the semen.
  • Benign prostatic hyperplasia, or BPH, involves enlargement of the prostate gland.
  • The prostate enlargement in benign prostatic hyperplasia is not malignant (not cancer).
  • BPH can impede the flow of urine.
  • Symptoms include frequent urge to urinate, getting up at night to urinate, difficulty urinating and dribbling of urine.
  • The treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia is usually reserved for patients with significant symptoms.
  • Medical and surgical approaches are available to treat BPH.

What is the prostate gland?

The prostate is a small organ about the size of a walnut. It lies below the bladder (where urine is stored) and surrounds the urethra (the tube that carries urine from the bladder). The prostate makes a fluid that helps to nourish sperm as part of the semen (ejaculatory fluid).

Prostate problems are common in men 50 and older. Most can be treated successfully without harming sexual function.

What is benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH)?

Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is nonmalignant (noncancerous) enlargement of the prostate gland, a common occurrence in older men. It is also known as benign prostatic hyperplasia and abbreviated as BPH. It’s also referred to as and enlarged prostate gland.

At what age do men develop the condition?

BPH generally begins in a man’s 30s, evolves slowly, and most commonly only causes symptoms after 50.

How common is the condition? Are there any risk factors?

BPH is extremely common. Advanced age is a risk factor for an enlarged prostate. Half of all men over 50 develop symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia, but only 10% need medical or surgical intervention.

What happens in BPH? What are the signs and symptoms?

In benign prostatic hyperplasia, the prostate gland grows in size. It may compress the urethra which courses through the center of the prostate. This can impede the flow of urine from the bladder through the urethra to the outside. It can cause urine to back up in the bladder (retention) leading to the need to urinate frequently during the day and night.

Other common symptoms include a slow flow of urine, the need to urinate urgently and difficulty starting the urinary stream. More serious problems include urinary tract infections and complete blockage of the urethra, which may be a medical emergency and can lead injury to the kidneys.

Male Torso Picture - Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH)

Male Torso Picture – Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH)

Is BPH a type of cancer?

No! BPH is completely benign. It is not a precursor (a forerunner) to prostate cancer.

What procedures or tests diagnose this prostate problem?

A doctor or other health care professional usually can detect an enlarged prostate by rectal examination. The doctor also may examine the urethra, prostate, and bladder using a cytoscope, an instrument that is inserted through the penis or with ultrasound.

Which specialties of doctors treat the problem?

A urologist is a specialist in diseases of the urinary system, including diagnosing and treating problems of the prostate gland.

Are there natural or home remedies to treat BPH or enlarged prostate?

Watchful waiting often is chosen by men who are not bothered by symptoms of BPH. They have no treatment except to get regular checkups and wait to see whether or not the condition gets worse. Medical treatment of enlarged prostate is usually reserved for men with significant symptoms.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 5/18/2017

Published at Thu, 18 May 2017 07:00:00 +0000

Health Tip: Avoiding Processed Foods

Health Tip: Avoiding Processed Foods Title: Health Tip: Avoiding Processed FoodsCategory: Health NewsCreated: 5/18/2017 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 5/18/2017 12:00:00 AM Published at Thu, 18 May 2017 00:00:00 PDT

Gynecomastia (Enlarged Male Breasts Symptoms, Causes, and Treatments)

Gynecomastia (Enlarged Male Breasts Symptoms, Causes, and Treatments)

Gynecomastia (Enlarged Male Breasts Symptoms, Causes, and Treatments) Enlarged Breast Tissue in Men True gynecomastia is an enlargement of the male breast gland because of a hormonal imbalance, but the appearance of enlarged may breasts may be ascribed to pseudogynecomastia, a symptom of excess fat […]

Just 2 Weeks on the Couch Can Trigger Body's Decline

Just 2 Weeks on the Couch Can Trigger Body's Decline

Just 2 Weeks on the Couch Can Trigger Body's Decline

News Picture: Just 2 Weeks on the Couch Can Trigger Body's DeclineBy Steven Reinberg
HealthDay Reporter

Latest Exercise & Fitness News

WEDNESDAY, May 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Taking a short break from an active lifestyle may do more harm than most people might think, a new study warns.

Just two weeks of sedentary behavior can cause healthy, young people to start losing muscle and develop fat around their organs. And this can increase their risk for conditions such as heart disease and type 2 diabetes that could eventually lead to a premature death, British researchers report.

“What’s alarming about this study is that it was done in healthy volunteers. They were not patients or overweight or had risks for type 2 diabetes,” said lead researcher Kelly Bowden-Davies, from the Institute of Aging and Chronic Disease at the University of Liverpool.

“In 14 days we see small, but significant, changes in markers that predispose people to risk,” she said.

In the study, people were asked to limit their physical activity for two weeks. This included taking the elevator instead of the stairs, taking a bus instead of walking and staying at home more than usual, Bowden-Davies said.

After two weeks of a sedentary life, participants lost nearly a pound of lean muscle mass and gained body fat. The increase in body fat tended to be in the belly, a major risk factor for developing chronic diseases.

In addition, fitness levels dropped sharply, and participants were not able to run for as long or at the same intensity as they had before, the researchers found.

Mitochondrial function, which is the ability of cells to regulate energy, also dropped, but the change was not statistically significant, the study authors noted.

“Globally, people are becoming more and more inactive due to technology, public transport, escalators and elevators, and machines that do what we used to do day to day,” Bowden-Davies said.

The good news is that after going back to an active lifestyle, all these changes were reversed and returned to normal within two weeks, she said.

“The negative effect of an inactive lifestyle can be reversed when we become active again,” Bowden-Davies said.

Going to the gym a couple of times a week, however, won’t reverse the trends of an otherwise sedentary life, she said. Exercise is good, but you need to be active all day, which includes being on your feet and taking walk breaks, Bowden-Davies said.

The problem is more severe in older people who have a sedentary lifestyle and are probably in worse shape than younger people, she said. But it’s never too late to change your lifestyle and see improvements in your health.

The findings were to be presented Wednesday at the European Congress on Obesity, in Porto, Portugal. Research presented at meetings is considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

According to Dr. Minisha Sood, an endocrinologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City, “We’ve known all along that being sedentary will increase the risk of gaining fat and losing muscle, and overall poorer health.” Sood was not involved with the new study but is familiar with the findings.

“What’s novel about this study is that it emphasizes how little time it takes of a sedentary life to start to see those changes,” she added.

But Sood wasn’t sure that going back to an active lifestyle would reverse all of the damage a sedentary period causes. Some of these changes may be permanent, she said.

“If your goal is to be in optimal health, you shouldn’t have a sedentary lifestyle,” Sood said. “An active lifestyle is one where physical activity is built into the day, throughout the day.”

In addition, different types of exercise — like resistance training to counter the aging of muscle and cardio training to increase stamina — are important, Sood said.

“The point is not to hit the gym once or twice a week, but to build an active lifestyle where you are taking walks outside and not sitting all day,” she said.

For the study, Bowden-Davies and her colleagues collected data on 28 healthy, physically active people, average age 25, with a normal body weight. The participants walked an average of 10,000 steps per day and all wore an armband that kept track of their physical activity.

At the start of the study, participants were given a medical checkup that included measuring fat and muscle mass, mitochondrial function and physical fitness.

The exam was done two weeks later after the participants had reduced their physical activity by more than 80 percent, to around 1,500 steps per day.

In addition, the participants kept a journal of what and how much they ate to ensure there were no changes in diet throughout the study, Bowden-Davies said.

MedicalNews
Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

SOURCES: Kelly Bowden-Davies, M.Sc., Institute of Aging and Chronic Disease, University of Liverpool, U.K.; Minisha Sood, M.D., endocrinologist, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York City; May 17, 2017, presentation, European Congress on Obesity, Porto, Portugal

Published at Thu, 18 May 2017 07:00:00 +0000

Could a Weight-Loss Surgery Lead to Alcohol Abuse?

Could a Weight-Loss Surgery Lead to Alcohol Abuse? Title: Could a Weight-Loss Surgery Lead to Alcohol Abuse?Category: Health NewsCreated: 5/17/2017 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 5/18/2017 12:00:00 AM Published at Thu, 18 May 2017 00:00:00 PDT